the Lala Luna Aura Interview: Electronic Pop's Next Big Thing

Love Electronic Pop? Meet Your New Favorite Artist, Luna Aura

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With a bold spunk and admirable authenticity, rising dream pop artist Luna Aura has got a super clear eye for what music needs next, and she is making it known through her incredible tracks that it is most definitely her.

Hailing from Phoenix, AZ, Luna combines a variety of unique sounds that result in a beautiful, cosmic mix of dance electro-pop. She’s a singer, songwriter, and producer that is mega inspired by everything around her, from her ridiculously early start in the music world to her incredible circle of support she keeps around her.

She’s got lyrics laced with deeper meanings and raw feelings, making for all over standout tracks that back her badass personality. The Lala sat down with her  to talk about her journey, how she keeps grounded, and her latest EP, Supernova (and we fell majorly in love with her in the process).

 

the Lala: You started writing songs at age 10 and performing at age 15. What was that like and how do you think that early start influenced where you are now?

Luna: I was listening to a lot of Tony Braxton, Whitney Houston, and a lot of R&B and hip-hop in the 90s as well and the early 2000s where there was a lot of the pop stuff that was coming out, Britney Spears. I feel like when I was 10 all I was really doing was imitating what I was hearing. I watched a little too much TV so I wrote a lot of really dramatic songs about relationships that I had never even been in. I didn’t even know what a relationship was, but I was just like writing songs about how I didn’t need this guy anymore in my life. I was heavily influenced by everything I was listening to growing up, and I taught myself guitar at the age 14 and went out and started performing my own songs at 15.

 

We can tell from your lyrics that you’re all about inspiring and empowering others. What are tips and tricks you use to keep grounded and positive throughout your busy lifestyle?

11998909_456830287823032_803799925855427628_nI spend a lot of time with my family and I spent a lot of time with my really close friends. It is very rare that I ever kind of branch out. It’s difficult because [in this industry] you have to network all the time with people. I don’t want to say they are fake, but there are a lot of people that can lead you in the wrong direction in this industry. So, I kind of like to stay with my family and the little family I’ve built all my life of my friends. It helps me remember all the things that are important and actually matter, which then turns into music that I create that is just about things that matter. You know, it’s not about partying, going out, and being like “Oh, I’m so cool”. It’s about everything is a lesson. I learn a lot from the people I have in my life.

 

Your sounds are really such a blend of everything that is important in music right now: electronic, pop, synth, hip-hop. Tell us about what moves you to combine those music styles to make the tracks that you do? 

When I actually first started playing music, I did a lot of the indie acoustic kind of stuff, a lot of rock. Because I played guitar, I was like this is the only way it is going to carry over and make any sense, if I played rock or if I played acoustic. And I honestly just got so tired of it because I am such a performer. I got sick of having the guitar right in front of me every single show. So, I decided to learn how to produce music, and I started working on the classes to teach myself. And from there, I listen to rap all the time, I listen to hip-hop all the time, I listen to pop all the time, so it was this moment in time where I was like “Wow, I can finally make music that I actually like”. So, that’s kind of where it stems from. I started my first EP almost 2 years ago now, and then I met my manager, we finished it, and I’ve been working with other producers and writers since. It really has opened the door for me as a writer and as a creator because I have so many different opportunities now.

 

 

Let’s talk about the new Supernova EP. What tracks standout to you the most on it?

The single “Dancing With Your Ghost” I would say is one of my favorites, but you’re not supposed to have a favorite kid and I do! I would say “Like You” is my favorite. It is definitely the popiest one I would say, but that one is just about being a weirdo and not feeling like you ever fit in. I feel like even the best of us feel that way at some point. It is about finding someone that is your kind and understands your story and is going through it with you and empowers you to take on the world.

 

Live performances are so central to an artist’s identity. What’s your favorite part of performing live?

Luna Aura, as a whole, that is the character I created when I first started producing electronic music because I think it was just a part of me that hadn’t been released at that point. I feel like we all have that piece inside of us, that powerhouse inside of us, that just wants to come out. When I’m going throughout my daily life, I am just a normal girl, but when I am on stage, I am Luna Aura. I am a whole other creature. I am a whole other being and it’s a completely different way of expressing yourself. It is so powerful and you feel so good about yourself while you’re doing it. Then on top it, the words that I am singing, I am hoping to inspire people in the crowd to feel good about themselves as well. So, it’s a huge, positive experience and I love that about my shows.

 

Top 3 favorite artists of all time.

I would have to say, Tony Braxton. “Unbreak My Heart” is the first song I ever sang and everything she does is magic. I feel like she uses her voice as an instrument. I love her to death. I would say, Nora Jones. She inspires me a lot as a singer as well and as a songwriter and how to be a poet in songwriting. And then, the last one? Katy Perry. Definitely Katy Perry. She has never lost that coolness or shine that she has. She is just a down girl all the time always. I love that about her. She is not afraid to be funny or quirky.
 

You aim to spread love, courage, and truth through art and music. Why is that important to you?

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Supernova EP

It is so important to me because it’s something that I needed to hear when I was younger and I just feel like especially for girls we talk about being bosses and not being basic and whatever is in the media right now, but I think being courageous is on a whole other level. It is about being proud of who you are and not being afraid to speak your mind and standing up for what you believe in. I feel like if you want to live truly happy life, you have to live a truly unapologetic life and be unapologetic to yourself and love yourself. It’s hard, especially in the world that we live in and society that we live in, they are constantly throwing these images of what we’re supposed to be, who we’re supposed to be, and what we’re supposed to be doing. Being courageous is the [opposite] of that. [It’s] saying I am going to do this because it is what is in my heart. I feel like that is the only way to live a truly happy life. And I want people to listen to my music, and I want my fans, friends, and family, I want them all to happy, so of course it is something that I want to preach and talk about.

 

Fast forward 5 years, where do you hope to see yourself and your music?

I hope I am touring. I hope I’m writing. I hope I’m writing for other people as well because I find a lot of happiness in that. I would love to be performing on television at some point! Some award shows. I don’t know, just the whole dream. I hope it’s there. The dream I had in my head when I was 10 years old.

 

Check out her single “Dancing With Your Ghost” below and follow her on Twitter and Facebook for more.

Editorial Contributor, University of Texas at Austin
Major: Radio-Television-Film
Her heart belongs to: British rock bands, pugs, Wes Anderson movies, and guacamole.
You can find her: listening/profusely belting her lungs out to music that moves her soul, drinking jugs of San Pellegrino, or at the fiercely battling to get front row barricade at a concert.

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