Why We Should Embrace Year-Round Resolutions

Featured image via @itsdemib

At the beginning of every year I resolve to do something. Sign up for a Zumba class. Actually go to said Zumba class. Cook more. Pick up a new hobby. Call my grandparents more often.

Despite choosing typically reasonable goals and trying all of the different tricks to set myself up for success, I have never stuck to my New Year’s resolutions for more than a month or two. This year, I discovered a main reason why.

As a college student the new year comes right in the middle of winter break. Despite wanting to make a commitment to fitness, in the middle of my winter break all I want to do is be a vegetable (not eat them) and spend all day in bed with a book. I’m typically at home for an extended amount of time, living out of a suitcase, eating different foods and reveling in the one time of year when my calendar has nothing on it.

No matter how realistic my resolutions are, it’s difficult to create real change in my life at a time when I’m in a different place, with an irregular schedule. The timing just couldn’t be worse.

So why does the beginning of the year have to be the only time we can create change in our lives? While the idea of “starting fresh” at the beginning of the year seems to makes sense thematically, it’s far from the only time when you can decide to do things differently.

The times I feel like I need to cook more often don’t come when I’m on winter break eating free food from my parents’ fridge. They come in the middle of the semester when I find myself handing my debit card over to the pizza guy for the third time in a week.

January has come and gone but that doesn’t mean you have to wait another 11 months to decide to make some alterations in your life or create new healthy habits. If you’ve made New Year’s resolutions, right on. May the force be with you in keeping them. And if you didn’t, that’s ok too.

But if you decide in March you want to learn how to knit, then you can learn how to knit starting in March. Or if in April you want to commit to going to the gym more often, then you can commit to going to the gym more in April. A new year is a big deal but it doesn’t have to be the only time we can make big changes.

 

Rachel Weinfeld

Editorial Contributor, Ball State University Major: Vocal Performance Her heart belongs to: Pixar movies, Frank Sinatra, peppermint mochas, and good humans You can find her: Trying to pull herself together in a coffee shop. Or singing. Always, always singing.

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